Welcome to Global Water Institute

Global Water Institute (GWI) is the first organization in the world that assists demobilized forces, using water-related programme activities for their reintegration for the purpose of conflict prevention and sustainable economic development.

Happy World Water Day 2016

Dear colleagues,


On behalf of Global Water Institute (GWI), I wish you a Happy World Water Day 2016.
Our theme this year: Consume Quality Water, Eat Organic. The consumption of high-nitrate drinking water/eating food is dangerous to human and environmental health.

Governments worldwide ought to initiate much stronger regulatory systems for domestic water supplies that set limit to 50mg of Nitrate per 1Liter of water consumption (50mg/L) and for chemical fertilizers.

The idea of this theme is not insignificant. Since I got back to work in Africa in late 2014, I realized that farmers from rural and urban settings, use chemical fertilizers with disproportionate measures. It then seemed urgent to orient GWI-Burundi toward a new strategy based on Bio-organic Farming (BF). Choosing BF requires quality water free from high rate of nitrates’ level. Click here to read more...

Author: 
Valerie Ndaruzaniye
Type: 
Report
Publication year: 
2016

Water and Environmental Security for Conflict Prevention in Times of Climate Change

Water and Environmental Security in Times of Climate Change

Current environmental challenges of Sub-Saharan Africa may be a source of future environmental insecurity leading to social and political conflict. With a changing climate and resources such as water becoming more scarce, there is a risk for greater competition over natural resources.

Science predicts that in the near future climate change will affect the world in unprecedented ways, and Africa will be one of the most severely impacted continents. Climate change is likely to have disastrous impacts on the social, economic, environmental and political prosperity of the continent. Some estimates predict that by 2050 average temperatures will rise by 1.5 to 3°C, floods and droughts will become more common and rain-fed agriculture will be reduced by 50%. Further research is however needed in the area of conflict prevention strategies.

Author: 
Florence Lozet and Edou Kim
Type: 
Article
Publication year: 
2013

Balancing Friendships between Man and Nature

Balancing Friendships between Man and Nature

Protecting human security implies caring for Nature. Since Man has chosen to produce more than he needs, Nature’s response has been the changing climate with many unpredictable events for which Man will never be able to plan with accurate timing. Communities should be re-taught how to relate to their Nature. Investing in community knowledge on how to cope with Nature is therefore urgently needed.

States should provide citizens with greater new insights showing how the private sector and government tasks are the appropriate mix leading to economic development in a cleaner environment. It is now clearer that the private sector and States are complementary. State action is vital in laying down the institutional foundations for green markets. click here to read more.

Author: 
Valerie Ndaruzaniye
Type: 
Article
Publication year: 
2013

Future Water Security in a Changing Environment

Human and Environmental Security Issues
Future Water Security in a Changing Environment

Effects related to water stress impacts 44 percent of the population in the world. By 2025 global freshwater stress will have accelerated further in a substantial manner due to increased population and water use, especially in regions as the north of Africa and the Middle East. By 2050, approximately 5 billion people will have felt the effects related to freshwater scarcity.

Factsheets contained in this paper provide current data on: Global Water Security;Water and Climate Change; Water and Sanitation;Status of Women and Children vis-à-vis safe drinking water scarcity in developing countries; Water and Cities and; the impact of Climate Change on water and CO2 increase.

Author: 
GWI I
Type: 
Article
Publication year: 
2013

Future Water (In) Security: Facts, Figures and Predictions

 

More than 2.8 billion people in 48 countries will face water stress or conditions of scarcity by 2025. By the middle of this century, this number will have reached almost 7 billion. It is projected that by 2025 water withdrawals will have increased by 50%. The quantity of water available is sufficient to satisfy the global need, the real problems lie in the supply chain.

 

Author: 
Elizabeth Hameeteman
Type: 
Article
Publication year: 
2013

Time for Plan B: Positive Effects of Gender Sensitive and Environmental Policies -European Parliament –European United Left/Nordic Green Left (GUE/NGL)

GWI President Valerie Ndaruzaniye spoke to the European Parliament –European United Left/Nordic Green Left (GUE/NGL) on the Impact of Climate Change on Women in the African Societies, on April 10, 2013, Brussels, Belgium.

Offering a message focused on the impact of climate change and women in the African societies, her rousing speech received flattering reviews from audience members and was praised as powerful and a speech worthy of its presentation.

MEP Mikael Gustafsson, GUE/NGL invited Ndaruzaniye to offer her insights on the issues inherent in the environmental sustainability and gender policies, because of her global experience in helping governments to reform environmental policies, mainly water-related ones in post-conflict Sub-Saharan countries and other African nations where water is scarce. Click here to read the full document from which the major statement points were taken.

Les 72 Heures de l'Eau

Date: 
Wed, 2013-03-20 08:00 - Fri, 2013-03-22 17:00
Type: 
Conference
Location: 
Ouagadougou
Country: 
Burkina Faso

Les 72 Heures de l’Eau

Ouagadougou 2013

20 au 22 mars

          THEME : La crise mondiale de l’eau –

Coopération pour une gouvernance  efficace

des  bassins transfrontaliers

Approach to Reintegration of Ex-Combatants through Water Strategies

E.Hameeteman & S.Jadot_.Upfront.png

Hundreds of thousands of ex-combatants in Africa make the environment unliveable and unsustainable, adding further stress to already weakened state structures and traumatized populations that often times are faced with imminent food crises and food price volatility. The inclusion of ex-combatants in the implementation of water-related programs is essential for environmental sustainability.

Author: 
E.Hameeteman, S.Jadot
Type: 
Article
Publication year: 
2013

Scenarios for Future Water Security

Date: 
Fri, 2013-03-22 10:00 - 17:00
Type: 
Conference
Location: 
Brussels
Country: 
Belgium

 

Scenarios for Future Water Security 

GWI Workshop

Brussels, 22 March, 2013

10.00-17.00


1. Workshop Outline

Could policymakers alter the future of water security just by laying various cards on the table and questioning alternative options?  

Could strategists create scenarios which pre-set the proper actions to do to secure water and make it accessible to all African people by 2025?

Water security is a large and complex issue encompassing the many efforts required to assure a safer environment for prosperous economies now and in the future. Water withdrawals are projected to increase by 50% and 18% by 2025 in the developing and developed world, respectively, due to both population and industrial growth.

The proportion of the African population at risk of water stress and scarcity will increase to 65% in 2025. This could generate conflicts over water, particularly in arid and semi-arid regions.

Are strategists able to underlie formulas to be utilized for the achievements of any water strategic plan applicable in 2025?  The GWI’s 2013 workshop "Scenarios for Future Water Security" will tackle this important topic.

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